How to deal with the fear of being fired from workplace

How to deal with the fear of being fired from workplace

Fear of being fired can generate high levels of stress for the employee, especially if the company or organization is in a time of crisis. It is usually one of the most worrisome fears, and that has the most negative consequences for the person, both at work and in health. 

However, the problem is that this fear only makes things worse: work gets worse when we are anxious, and attention wanes, which affects productivity. And, the health also deteriorates when the body lives in a state of alertness. 

To ease this tension, here have listed some practical ways to deal with this fear:

Don’t panic

If you think you are going to get fired, it is natural for that to happen. “But remember, the signs can be interpreted incorrectly,” says Lynn Taylor, a workplace expert. “Sometimes the rumors spread, interrupting work in the department until you bravely talk to your boss.” Before reaching any conclusions and starting to get anxious, talk to your manager. But don’t consult with other employees about this problem.

Talk to your boss

Once your suspicions seem well-founded, you must corroborate them with those who can decide. Ask for a meeting with your boss or with human resources to contrast what is your real situation within the company. Always be calm and understanding, assuming that layoffs are a natural part of working life so that your boss can be frank without fear that you will get the job done or decide to sabotage your job the time you have left. If he perceives that your answer is not going to be calm, he may tell you what you want to hear, and the decision will come to you without warning at the end.

Ask for references

Does it seem crazy to ask for references from someone who just fired you? What are the chances of getting a positive recommendation? Well, it’s certainly not absurd, and the chances of going out with a decent referral are greater than you think. It is always worthwhile to try this negotiation before emptying the table and cupboard and leaving. Ensuring some kind of referral will help you to dispel any concerns you may have about explaining your departure to future employers. 

Today employers are beginning to worry about possible legal problems that may result from giving a bad reference, and what you will notice is that they will avoid going into details. Usually, they will confirm your job assignments and report the period you worked at the company. Unless you have been fired for cause, employers do not tend to mention negative aspects at most they will refuse your request for a letter of reference.

Set what your transition period will be 

Check your finances. What savings do you have? Can you count on the help of your partner or family at a critical moment? What expendable expenses do you maintain and which ones are unavoidable? And calculate what unemployment benefits you can aspire to , how long they will last, and how much they will amount to. Based on that, decide what your sustainable monthly budget is as long as possible. Knowing the period you can live without working will help you design your strategy.

Closing thoughts

Always being afraid of losing your job can do a lot of damage to your confidence and can end your self-esteem. When you become unemployed, you will have the chance to remember who you are, your accomplishments, and your professional successes. You will discover that you are still the same intelligent, capable person with a lot of skills and knowledge, which other companies or law firms will certainly appreciate. That way, you will conclude that the only thing that has changed is that you are now momentarily out of work. 

So, let go of fear and focus on your future. Be sure that new doors will open, and great opportunities will appear for you to continue to build a successful career.

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